PSORIASIS

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition characterized by an unpredictable course of remissions and relapses and presence of solid elevated patches with loose silvery scales at typical sites like scalp, elbows, knees, outer aspect of limbs, palms and soles. There is frequent nail and joint involvement. Exact cause for psoriasis is unknown but many factors have been incriminated. About 30% of people with psoriasis have a family history of the condition, and certain genes have been linked to psoriasis. However, the condition will only appear if it is triggered by an environmental factor. Triggers may include stressful life events, infection with certain viruses and bacteria, skin injury, or reactions to certain medications. Adaptation to living with a disease is a broad term which encompasses a range of phenomena, including quality of life, emotional well-being, self-esteem, acceptance of life with a disease, social participation and fulfillment of social roles. In chronic diseases, such as psoriasis, affected individuals need to develop psychological mechanisms enabling them to adapt to the disease in the best way possible.

Psoriasis can have a significant impact on the quality of life of those who are afflicted due to chronicity of the disease and frequent remissions and relapses. There are many topical and systemic medicines taken internally to treat psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Phototherapy is another treatment option and there are practical ways to care for the skin that may help to remove psoriasis scales, improve the skin’s ability to move and bend or to make the skin feel better. Treating psoriasis is critical to good disease management and overall health. Work with dermatologist to find a treatment—or treatments—that reduce or eliminate your symptoms. What works for one person with psoriasis might not work for another. So it’s important to know the different treatment options and keep trying until you find the right regimen for you.

Recent advances in the understanding of the cause of psoriasis have led to the development of new, genetically engineered, targeted therapies for this condition. Still, reassurance and emotional support are invaluable. Physical and mental rest may enhance the effects of the specific management of acute episodes.

FAQs- Psoriasis

Is psoriasis a rare disease?

Psoriasis is a multifactorial genetic disease. About 30% of people with psoriasis have a family history of the condition, and certain genes have been linked to psoriasis. However, the condition will only appear if it is triggered by an environmental factor. Triggers may include stressful life events, infection with certain viruses and bacteria, skin injury, or reactions to certain medications.

Is psoriasis contagious ?

Psoriasis is not contagious. It cannot be caught from touching someone who has the condition, swimming in the same pool, sharing towels, or eating food prepared by a person with psoriasis.

How about dietary advice for psoriasis patients ?

Diet is thought to play only a small role in psoriasis. In general, a well balanced diet is advisable in people with psoriasis, just as it is in everyone. Avoid alcohol and smoking which reduce your immunity.

Is psoriasis incurable?

The treatment of psoriasis should be individualized and depends on patient and disease factors. Treatment is concerned with control rather than cure. Psoriasis can be very well managed with sustained judicious use of various treatments.

Any alternative treatments exists that can cure psoriasis?

No conventional and alternative treatments exists that can cure psoriasis.

What is the role of climate and sunlight?

Hot, humid environments tend to make bad cases of psoriasis worse. In contrast, sunlight and dry, sunny climates, as a rule are helpful – particularly in mild cases.

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